Test Rig and Procedures

Test System

Motherboard: MSI X470 Gaming M7 AC- Live Pricing

Cooling: Noctua NH-U12S for cooling - Live Pricing

 Noctua NT-H1 Thermal Paste - Live Pricing

Memory: G-Skill Sniper 3400MHz CL16-16-16-36 8GB - Live Pricing

Storage: Kingston HyperX 240GB SSD - Live Pricing

Video Card: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti - Live Pricing

Power Supply: Corsair TX750M - Live Pricing

Case: Dimastech Test Bench - Live Pricing

OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit - Live Pricing

testing

 

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VaporX's Avatar
VaporX replied the topic: #38527 01 Jun 2018 22:19
For gaming oriented builds I think the Ryzen 5 is a superior choice to the Ryzen 7. The performance delats are very close and the extra cores have minimal impact in a gaming system. The lower cost means more budget for graphics card, monitor or peripherals.

I am curious about your actual clock speeds. As I understand it the new new boost technology is more about the cooling solution than the work load and works to boost as many cores as it can within the cooling potential. I am seeing people say they are seeing around 3.8 Ghz on all cores under load with decent cooling, all the time.
garfi3ld's Avatar
garfi3ld replied the topic: #38528 02 Jun 2018 07:22
With the 2600, I'm seeing 4100MHz on single threaded applications and 3400 when using every core. The issue here is without manual overclocking, AMD still has to work within the limitations of the 65-watt TDP on both CPUs. So the new Precision Boost 2 works well, but is going to give you a lot more with the higher TDPs of the 2600X and 2700X.

HardOCP just posted up good overclocking coverage where they ran into the same TDP limitation as well. But the 2700 that they tested (and the 2600 that they haven't published) are both going to have similar overclocking room manually that the 2600X and 2700X have with PB2 and more, at a lower price even. Have to love all of the CPUs being unlocked :D

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